» Search The Site

Friday, 27 January 2017 12:36

Dairy nutrition research scientist awarded posthumous Order of Australia

Written by 
International Dairy Federation (IDF) President Jim Begg (left) presenting Dr Parodi (right) with his 2007 lifetime contribution award. International Dairy Federation (IDF) President Jim Begg (left) presenting Dr Parodi (right) with his 2007 lifetime contribution award.

Internationally acclaimed dairy nutrition research scientist and biochemist Dr Peter Parodi has been awarded an Order of Australia for his more than 60 years of service to the dairy industry and to science.


Dr Parodi, who passed away in July 2015, worked for the dairy industry from the age of 18 to the age of 81 and changed the way the world thinks about dairy foods. The award has been given in recognition of his trailblazing research into milk fat and scientific reviews about the overall health benefits of dairy products, as well as his significant service to science as a biochemist.

During the 1970s, Dr Parodi published pioneering research identifying and characterising previously unknown minor components of milk, particularly those found within fat. In 1977, he was the first person to identify a novel substance in milk fat, which at that time he called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). He later named it ‘rumenic acid’ after a cow’s stomach system.

Dairy Australia Nutrition Research and Science Manager, Dr Anita Lawrence, said Dr Parodi’s discovery of CLA in milk fat had led to a whole new area of nutrition research.

Dr Parodi also wrote many reviews showing there is much more to dairy foods than just saturated fat. He highlighted the presence of numerous other nutrients within in dairy foods and the overall effect of dairy foods on health.

“These visionary reviews started chains of events leading to today’s recognition of the health benefits of dairy foods,” Dr Lawrence said.

“And he continued working and submitting reviews up to his 81st birthday.”

“Dr Parodi was a great mentor to younger researchers,” Dr Lawrence said.

“His enthusiasm for nutrition research was infectious. I am so pleased that his important contribution has been recognised with an Order of Australia. The dairy industry is indebted to him for his invaluable research.”

More like this

High production cows milked three times a day

Dairy farmer Alex Huisman is no stranger to milking three times a day. However, he fine-tuned the process, adding a third milking for 84 high production cows from his herd of 150 head.

Australia caught in game of currency roulette

While the world market for dairy products is in much better shape going into the 2017/18 southern production season, there are still a few risks that may weaken milk prices for Southern Australian dairy farmers.

Yoghurt's rainbow of flavours

I’m old enough to remember a time when there seemed to be about three flavours of yoghurt: vanilla, strawberry and, if you want to be really fancy, tropical.

More from this category

National Foods closes cheese sites

National Foods will sell its cheese processing plants in South Australia and close its two Victorian plants within three years.  The moves were announced as part of a $132 million investment in Tasmania, aimed at rationalising the company’s cheese making business.

NZ payout drop delivers a 'sobering blow'

NEW ZEALAND dairy farmers will be forced to make more hard decisions in the season ahead, as the country’s processors slash their forecast farm gate milk prices to well below the cost of production.

Milk processors want you

International demand and expansion in local processing facilities has fuelled renewed competition between Australian processors for southern milk supply.

Scramble for precious water in WA

SOME 2200 megalitres of water might seem only a drop in the ocean for flood weary farmers in northern and eastern Australia but in the drought-stricken west every bit of a new allocation will be precious.

Progression plan a work in progress

Unfortunately, many families can't broach the topic of succession planning at the kitchen table, so it was refreshing to hear WA farmer Peter Evans discussing his family's approach in front of 200 people.

Floods bring New Year chaos to northern dairy industry

THE QUEENSLAND dairy industry is starting 2011 in chaos, swamped by New Year floods engulfing the State.The big wet which drenched Central Queensland in December moved to the southeast corner of the State with devastating impact in the second week of January.

PRIME MINISTER Julia Gillard is deliberately misleading Australians by claiming she wants to keep the Murray-Darling reform process on time, according to Coalition Murray-Darling Basin spokesman Senator Simon Birmingham.

 

MURRAY GOULBURN has taken up all of its rights in takeover target Warrnambool Cheese & Butter Factory’s (WCBF) $48 million entitlement offer.

 

THE HEAD of one of the world’s largest dairy cooperative wants the industry to do more to promote the goodness of dairy.

MURRAY GOULBURN has increased its prices by 35c/kg for protein and 14c/kg for butterfat – or $5.25/kg for milksolids – backdated to July 1.

ALTHOUGH AREAS of northern Victoria may remain under water for months, the amount of damage wreaked by the state’s floods is slowly being assessed.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter the (*) required information where indicated.\nBasic HTML code is allowed.

» Get social

When butter and chocolate collide

TWO New Zealand companies Lewis Road Creamery and Whittakers have teamed up to deliver what must be every dairy lover’s dream: chocolate butter.

Milking it - Ice cream for dogs

EFFORTS to extend the market for dairy know no bounds, with an American company The Bear and The Rat, creating a yoghurt-based ice cream for dogs.

» E-Newsletter

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required